1350 AD Sideless Surcoat

GENERAL NOTES
MEASUREMENTS
LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS
CONSTRUCTION NOTES
SEWING DIRECTIONS
GORGET

sideless

Chemise of unbleached cotton with long tight fitting sleeves.

The cotehardie is a well fitting one-piece dress with flaring skirt and long tight sleeves.

The Sideless Surcoat is a continuation of the cyclas from a previous century but with exaggerated armhole openings. Usually this dress was decorated heraldically with the husband's arms on the right side, and the wife's arms on the left.


Hair is parted in the center and divided into two plaits, crossed in back of neck and brought around sides of head.

The head covering consisted of cauls or crispinettes over the hair, a gorget, or a type of veil called a nebule veil.

Shoes were of the turn-shoe style fastened by lacings. They were lengthened to an exaggerated toe.

Accessories consisted of a wide, ornate girdle worn low at hip level.

Jewelry consisted or rings and earrings.

GENERAL NOTES

Edward III actively encouraged the weaving trade at this time and many foreign craftsmen settled in England. This brought a noticeable change in fashion. The sideless surcoat was the formal over dress now worn over the cotehardie. The cotehardie had the long sleeves of the under tunic (which was sometimes not worn). The sides of the sideless surcoat were sometimes mere slits or they could be cut square-shaped. The neck was cut round and very low, leaving only narrow strips over the shoulders.

Hair was still dressed is large coils over the ears. The cauls were becoming squarer. The wimple or gorget was frequently worn attached to the hair coils or cauls. A new pleated style veil called a nebule veil was popular. Veils and throat coverings were the symbol of wifehood.

Accessories and jewels were the same as the cotehardie. Shoes lengthened to ridiculous proportions. Chopins were used under the shoes when outdoors.

Colors used for fabric were new bright tan, scarlet, murrey (a deep purple-red), greens, blues, red, tawney, red-browns, gray. The materials were the same as those used for Cotehardies.

The motifs used to decorate clothes were all over patterns including the square, lozenge, star, circle, as well as diagonal and horizontal stripes. Badges or monograms were used as all over patterns instead of the large heraldic blazonry. Makeup apparently was not used.

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MEASUREMENTS

Equipment needed: paper, tape measure, pencil, T-square ruler and/or yardstick. You will need the following measurements: (Where measurements are divided use the number obtained by division.)

Add 4" to all measurements before dividing.

TORSO MEASUREMENTS

EACH STEP IS NUMBERED AND SHOULD BE MARKED ON THE PATTERN AS THEY ARE USED. THESE NUMBERS WILL SERVE AS REFERENCE POINTS.

TORSO PATTERN

    sideless pattern
  1. Mark the shoulder point.
  2. Draw a line 2" toward the center and up 1/4", and make a dot.
  3. Mark the neckline (front).
  4. Connect point #2 with point #3 to make the neck.
  5. Measure down from #1 the distance to the waist and draw a horizontal line. Measure the number of inches for the waist and make a mark.
  6. Draw a curved line connecting #1 and #5.
  7. Draw a vertical line straight up 4" from #5.
  8. Draw a horizontal line out from #7 as the flair of the skirt.
  9. Measure down the distance from the nape of neck to the floor.
  10. Connect #8 and #9 in a curved line.
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LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS

pattern layout

Remember to cut all pieces on the grain, not the bias.

Step 1

Fold fabric lengthwise.





Step 2

Make pattern using directions above.







Step 3

Cut both front and back of dress. Remember to make neckline higher in back to prevent dress from falling off shoulders.





Step 4

Shorten pattern to hip length and cut front and back. Use this as the facings.

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CONSTRUCTION NOTES

General Sewing Tips:
  1. It is very important to pre-shrink all fabric. Treat the fabric as you would after the garment is complete.
  2. All seams are to have 1/2" seam allowances.
  3. Zigzag all edges to prevent raveling.
  4. Backstitch 1/4" at the beginning and end of each seam to keep seam from coming out.
  5. Pin pieces of fabric being sewn together before sewing to keep fabric from slipping and edges together while sewing.
  6. Always put "right" sides of fabric together when sewing.
  7. Mark "wrong" sides of material if necessary with a chalk pencil or soap as pieces are cut out.
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SEWING DIRECTIONS

Step 1

sew gores

Sew gores onto skirt of dress. Remember to lay it on the floor before pinning to make sure the "right" sides are together.

Step 2

Put any appliques and decorations on the skirt at this time.





Step 3

Open up the front and back of the dress and put the "right" sides together. Sew shoulders together and zigzag edges.









Step 4

Without separating the front and back of the dress, sew the side seams together from armpit to hem. The zigzag the edges.









Step 5

Sew shoulders of facing together.





Step 6

steps 3-6

Sew side seam of facing together.

Step 7

step 7

Pin "right" side of facing to "right" sides of dress and stitch all armhole edges and neckline edges. Match shoulder seams. Do not zigzag edges.

Step 8

Clip the seam allowance around the curve of the neck and armholes. This allows the fabric to lay down better after the facing is turned.

Step 9

Turn the facing inside out and iron it down at the neck. Then, topstitch along the neckline 1/4" from the edge. This keeps the facing from turning back over as easily. "Tack" the facing down at each of the seams. This does more of the same.

Step 10

Hem the bottom of the dress with a rolled hem.

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