Generic SCA Clothes

Generic Tunic
Accessories
Generic Gathered Skirt
Generic Shirt
Generic Pants
Bag Lining a Garment

Generic Tunic

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS
CONSTRUCTION NOTES
SEWING DIRECTIONS

FOUR WAYS TO LOOK MORE MEDIEVAL

  1. Wear some kind of headcovering. It is warm in the winter, protects from the sun in the summer, and completes the look of your clothing.
  2. Wear more than one layer. An undertunic can act as a "t-shirt" so that you don't have to wash your fancy overtunic which you have spent so much time hand embroidering. Having extra absorbent fabric, such as linen, next to you in the summer will keep you more comfortable.
  3. Use enough material. Skirts and tunics should have a good amount of fullness in the hem. It makes it easier to move, and looks very nice. In addition, skirts on women should go to at least the ankle (not mid-calf) and to the floor is better.
  4. Enjoy yourself! By changing into "garb", you can change your outlook on the world from modern to medieval. It can mark the difference between "the real world" and the Society.

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS

MATERIALS

Many people find cotton to be an economical substitute to linen and wool. If you choose to use cotton, you will be happier in pure cotton than in polyester-cotton blends. In general, a woven geometric pattern that is symmetrical will look believable. During the middle ages, colors varied greatly, so don't worry too much about that as long as they are colors that can be made by natural means. I recommend that you stay away from florescent and pearlized colors.

Step 1

Take the fabric and fold it in half from selvage to selvage then fold it in half lengthwise. (A selvage is the finished edge of the fabric).









Step 2

Use chalk and the shirt, folded in half lengthwise, to draw the outline of the tunic on the fabric as shown. Cut out the outline.

Step 3

Create the keyhole neckline by measuring around your neck and adjusting the circle shape until you have one that looks like the diagram below. It is also important to determine the depth of the slit in front. Take the difference between your neck measurement and your head measurement and divide in half. This is the minimum amount of slit that you will need to get the opening over your head. You may make the slit longer if desired. Draw the neck opening on the fabric, centering as shown. Be very careful to cut the opening and the slit along the grain of the fabric.

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CONSTRUCTION NOTES

General Sewing Tips:

  1. It is very important to pre-shrink all fabric. Treat the fabric as you would after the garment is complete.
  2. All seams are to have 1/2" seam allowances.
  3. Zigzag all edges to prevent raveling.
  4. Backstitch 1/4" at the beginning and end of each seam to keep seam from coming out.
  5. Pin pieces of fabric being sewn together before sewing to keep fabric from slipping and edges together while sewing.
  6. Always put "right" sides of fabric together when sewing.
  7. Mark " wrong" sides of material if necessary with a chalk pencil or soap as pieces are cut out.
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SEWING DIRECTIONS

Step 1

Finish the neckline edge any way you prefer. You may create a facing, or a more period method would be to bind the neckline edge with bias tape. Start the bias tape at the center back or at the bottom of the slit.

Step 2

Attach whatever trim is desired, now, while the garment is flat. Good choices of location for trim is around the neck and at the arm bicep or sleeve edge. Mostly it seems that the hems were not embellished in the middle ages. Choices of patterns for trim can include just about anything that doesn't look too modern such as diamonds, circles, squares, rectangles, elaborate birds and beasts. Don't use animals or flowers that look too realistic. Stay away from anything obviously made wiht mylar, pearls, or pearlized colors.

Step 3

Sew the side seams together.

Step 4

Hem the garment. Be sure that the fullness at the sides of the body is rounded so that the hem does not hang down unevenly.

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Accessories

Hats

One of the most useful thing to own is some kind of headwear. Not only does it protect your head from the sun or the cold, but it keeps off random dirt and helps prevent hair tangles.

Belts

Belts during this time were not very complicated. A belt a few inches longer than your waist, with a simple buckle is all that is needed. The extra length of belt is then knotted around the buckle. The diagram shows a belt fragment, still in a knot, with buckle and all.

Belt Pouches

Another thing that is very, very useful for SCA clothing is a belt pouch. We all need a way to carry our authorization cards. driver's license, car keys, etc. The belt pouch is one way to do this. Most illustrations of the time period show the pouches hanging around the knee to lower thigh of the wearer. The basic pouch can be made out of leather or fabric. The easiest method is to take a simple U shape, sew along the bottom and edges, and put a drawstring at the top. If you want to get fancy you can line it or decorate it.

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Generic Gathered Skirt

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS
CONSTRUCTION NOTES
SEWING DIRECTIONS

In order to create a perfect silhouette it is most important to understand how a well-made shirt should fit. It should:

  • move attractively
  • flow well over the hips
  • stand well out at the hem, regardless of the rigidity of the petticoats
  • hang evenly across the front so as not to trip the wearer
  • continue to wear well even after several years of use
  • should return to an attractive and intentional position after movement

The human waist is not a straight line parallel to the floor. Instead it sits at an angle with the front waist 1" - 2" lower than the back.

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS

MATERIALS

  • 4 yards of 54" fashion fabric
  • 4 yards of 54" lining fabric
  • sewing thread
  • skirt hooks and eyes
  • trim as desired

MEASUREMENTS

  • _____ A = waist to floor at center back
  • _____ B = to floor at side over the hip
  • _____ C = waist to floor at center front
  • _____ D = waist measurement + 1"
  • _____ E = waist measurement x 3 + 1/4 yard

These numbers are for general reference. Always take the natural measurements first before undergarments are added. You never know when you will need them.

PATTERN

This skirt is made with a long rectangle of fabric gathered or pleated onto a waistband. The first mistake most clothiers make with this skirt is to fail to drop the waist sufficiently in front. Consequently, the front is too long and the back is too short.

It is also important to realize that the skirt itself has thickness. The length of the skirt will be shortened slightly because it sits over the hip (depending on the fullness of the skirt). An addition of a bum roll must therefore also be taken into account, as the depth of the roll will shorten the skirt as well.

If you wish to wear a bum roll under your skirt, place the bum roll on and re-take the original three measurements. If desired, add a hoop and repeat. These three sets of numbers will be your guide to the perfect skirt.

Step 1

Fold your lining fabric in half the short way.

Step 2

fabric measurement

Because this skirt is basically a rectangle, there is not much need for an actual paper pattern. At the extreme left side of your fabric (by the fold), draw the back length (measurement A) over the bum roll including extra length for skirt fullness as though you are cutting on the fold. Draw a normal rectangle half the length of E.

Step 3

Draw a line at the approximate side (measurement B) and draw from the bottom up. This length will be shorter than the back length.

Step 4

Draw the height of the front (measurement C) also from the bottom up and then draw the sloping line that connects the top of all three lines. A skirt cut from this shape should, if measured correctly and made correctly, hang even with the floor. To add a train, simply add the extra length below the back and slope the shape down from the side seam area. The shorter the train, the farther forward the slope must end. Short trains that aren't sufficiently sloped will hang limp and flat rather than fan out.

Step 5

Repeat with the fashion fabric

Step 6

Create a waistband by cutting a strip from the fashion fabrid that is 6" wide by measurement D

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CONSTRUCTION NOTES

General Sewing Tips:

  1. It is very important to pre-shrink all fabric. Treat the fabric as you would after the garment is complete.
  2. All seams are to have 1/2" seam allowances.
  3. Zigzag all edges to prevent raveling.
  4. Backstitch 1/4" at the beginning and end of each seam to keep seam from coming out.
  5. Pin pieces of fabric being sewn together before sewing to keep fabric from slipping and edges together while sewing.
  6. Always put "right" sides of fabric together when sewing.
  7. Mark " wrong" sides of material if necessary with a chalk pencil or soap as pieces are cut out.
Back to Generic Gathered Skirt Top

SEWING DIRECTIONS

Step 1

Cut out all pieces and label for ease of identification. I prefer sticky notes.


Step 2

For a skirt that is open in the front, assemble to skirt by sewing the center back seams together.

If you want a closed front skirt, you will need to cut the fabric pieces at the side seam line. Sew the side seams, but leave 8 - 10 inches open on both sides. Sew the center back seams together, then sew the center front seams together.

Step 3

Once the outer layer is fully assembled and pressed, trim can be added. It is important that the seam allowances be carefully manipulated to not catch in the stitching. Completely unadorned skirts are rarely seen. Almost always there are at least bands of complementary fabric. These bands can be put on after the lining is joined to the outer fabric in order to hold the lining to the outer skirt.

Step 4

Sew together the side seam allowances of the lining and the shell with wrong sides together.

Step 5

Stitch all around the outside edges to secure them. This is a delicate step as the slightest shift up or down of either layer will make the skirt hang incorrectly. Use lots of pins!

Step 6

Cut strips of a stiff fabric, like canvas, or heavy linen for facings. These strips should be 2 - 4 inches in width and on the straight of grain.

Step 7

Sew the lengths of facing fabric together end to end and press the seam allowances open. Press a 3/8 - 1/2 inch fold down the entire lenth of one side.

Step 8

With right sides together, sew the facing down the center front, (closed front skirts omit that part), around the bottom hem and up the other side. Turn, press, and miter the corners. Hem the facing in place.

Step 9

For an open front skirt:

  • Starting from one end of the waistband, mark the middle (B) and quarter points (A) and (C) on the waistband. These marks will be used to align the skirt fabric.
  • Lay out the length of skirt fabric and fold it in half. Mark the center point of the top edge. (B) Fold the fabric in half again and mark the two quarter points (A) and (C). Make these marks easy to find. I use straight pins.
  • Pleat the skirt until the marks on the waistband and the skirt align.
  • Pin the waistband to the skirt with right sides together. Stitch.
  • Turn seam allowances toward the waistband.
  • Fold the waistband in half right sides together and stitch the ends.
  • Turn right side out. Hand sew the edge over the seam. Press.

Step 10

For a closed front skirt, use two waist bands; one for the front and one for the back.

Step 1

Sew hooks and eyes to the waistband.

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Generic Shirt

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS
MEASUREMENTS
CONSTRUCTION NOTES
SEWING DIRECTIONS

By the 1500's the shirt had come into being as an article of clothing. It was worn underneath a vest, jacket, doublet, or other piece of outerwear. The shirt was considered to be underwear and people didn't go out without anything else on.

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS

MATERIALS

  • 2 yards of 45" fabric
  • sewing thread

MEASUREMENTS

  • _____ A = Neck circumference + 1"
  • _____ B = Wrist circumference + 1"
  • _____ C = Shoulder point to shoulder point + 1"
  • _____ D = Shoulder to knee
  • _____ E = Shoulder to wrist + 4"
layout 1

Step 1

layout 2

Cut two body rectangles using measurement D x C.


Step 2

layout 3

Take measurement E and mark out two sleeve rectangles that long and 1/2 fabric width.

Step 3

Cut the collar and cuff bands where the length of each piece is taken from measurement A + 1" for the collar and measurement B plus 1" for each wrist. Make the collar 2" at its widest point (plus 1" for seam allowance). Cut 2 collar pieces. Cut the cuffs about 2" wide (plus 1" for seam allowance). Round the ends of the collar and cuffs. To get the curves even, fold the fabric in half and cut both curves at the same time.

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CONSTRUCTION NOTES

General Sewing Tips:

  1. It is very important to pre-shrink all fabric. Treat the fabric as you would after the garment is complete.
  2. All seams are to have 1/2" seam allowances.
  3. Zigzag all edges to prevent raveling.
  4. Backstitch 1/4" at the beginning and end of each seam to keep seam from coming out.
  5. Pin pieces of fabric being sewn together before sewing to keep fabric from slipping and edges together while sewing.
  6. Use French seams for construction which means that "wrong" sides are sewn together first. Then the fabric is flipped and sewn again, "right" sides together.
  7. Mark "wrong" sides of material if necessary with a chalk pencil or soap as pieces are cut out.
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SEWING DIRECTIONS

Step 1

pin to divide fabric

Along the top of what will be the front and back of the shirt mark or pin to divide the fabric into three equal parts. The center section will be gathered into a collar. The side sections will need to be gathered to fit on the shoulder. Arrange the gathers evenly and sew or pin them in place to keep them from moving later. Sew the shoulders together where they are gathered.











Step 2

lay out sleeve pieces

Lay the sleeve pieces out with the length running from right to left. Fold in half lengthwise to find the center, and mark it at each end. One end of the sleeve will attach to the cuff, the other will attach to the shirt body.

Step 3

Match up the center mark on the sleeves with the shoulder seam on the shirt bodies, right sides of the fabric together. Sew the sleeves on.

Step 4

sew long seams

Sew the long seam from wrist, along the sleeve, and down the sides of the shirt.






Step 5

cut slit

On the top of each sleeve, cut a 2 - 3" slit perpendicular to the edge of the fabric. Cover the raw edges of the slit with bias tape to match the fabric.

Step 6

Gather the open end of each sleeve along the raw edges to fit your wrist measurement E.

Step 7

Place the collar pieces right sides together and sew along the ends and across the top. Snip the curves, turn, and press.

Step 8

Fold the bottom (open, unsewn) edge of the collar up 1/2". Press.




Step 9

Repeat steps 6 - 8 to make the cuffs.




Step 10

cuff

Open up each cuff piece and fit the gathered end of the sleeve into it. Start at the slit, pinning it securely into one end of the cuff, and arranging he rest of the gathered sleeve so it all fits evenly. The opposite end of the cuff should hold the other side of the tape-covered slit. Pin Securely. Sew.

Step 11

After each cuff is attached, lay out the ribbon and cut two lengths 18" long. Center each length over he cuff, on top of the machine stitching and sew it in place over the seam.

Step 12

In the center front of the shirt body, make a slit about 6" long down from the neckline. Cover the raw edge with bias tape that matches the fabric.

Step 13

Fold the collar band in half and crease where the back center will be. Also mark the quarter points. These will mark where the shoulders should match up.

Step 14

Begin by marking the center back of the shirt with a pin. Gather all the fabric into the neckline until it meets measurement A.

Step 15

Starting at the center back, match up the collar mark and the back of the shirt. Pin securely. Match up each shoulder seam with the quarter marks on the collar. Pin securely.

Step 16

Gather the rest of the shirt fabric into the collar band and arrange it as evenly as possible.

Step 17

Sew the shirt to the collar.

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Generic Pants

A lot of medieval costumes, especially for men, call for pants. These pants are very simple to make and do not require much fabric. These pants may not look pretty, but I promise you, your fighter will never pop the crotch seam!

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS
CONSTRUCTION NOTES
SEWING DIRECTIONS

LAYOUT AND CUTTING DETAILS

MATERIALS

  • twice the length desired +1/2 yard of 45" fabric
  • sewing thread

MEASUREMENTS

  • _____ A = Hip at the widest + 4"
  • _____ B = Thigh at the widest + 4"
  • _____ C = Crotch length / 2
  • _____ D = Inseam to ankle + 1"
  • _____ E = waist to ankle + 1"

NOTE: To get the crotch length, use a tape to measure around the middle of the body from the point where the top of the pants will be in front to where the top will be in the back, passing the tape between the legs. The tape should remain fairly loose when making this measurement. Divide this measurement by 2 to get the final crotch length.

Step 1

pants pattern Take measurement E and cut the yardage into two equal pieces that length. Each will become a pants leg.

Step 2

Using chalk, draw a line horizontally across the fabric. Make the line 1/2 A minus 4". For example, if A=54", then 1/2 A = 27. By subtracting 4" from that = 22". Measure down 2" for the waist band and then begin step 3.

Step 3

Take measurement C and mark a curved line on each piece as shown in the diagram to form the front crotch line.



Step 4

To make the back crotch line, go to the other side of the fabric, measure 1/2 of A, and mark this point. From there go down 18" and over 4". Connect these two points with a curved line. Mark this line "A".



Step 5

Mark an angled line from front and back crotch points to the length desired. Taper as desired.

Step 6

back gusset 2 To make the gusset, cut a rectangle 18" long by about 8" wide. Fold that rectangle in half lengthwise. Measure down 10"and from that point trim to about 4".
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CONSTRUCTION NOTES

General Sewing Tips:

  1. It is very important to pre-shrink all fabric. Treat the fabric as you would after the garment is complete.
  2. All seams are to have 1/2" seam allowances.
  3. Zigzag all edges to prevent raveling.
  4. Backstitch 1/4" at the beginning and end of each seam to keep seam from coming out.
  5. Pin pieces of fabric being sewn together before sewing to keep fabric from slipping and edges together while sewing.
  6. Always put "right" sides of fabric together when sewing.
  7. Mark "wrong" sides of material if necessary with a chalk pencil or soap as pieces are cut out.
Back to Generic Pants Top

SEWING DIRECTIONS

Step 1

pants inseam

Sew inseams for both legs to within 2" of the short edge.




Step 2

sew gusset to back crotch seam

Sew the long edge of the gusset to the back crotch curve on each pants leg.









Step 3

Sew the front crotch seam.




Step 4

sew inner leg seams

Sew the remainder of the inseam together making sure to open all seam allowances and to match the edges.





Step 5

Baste center front seam allowance flat.

Step 6

Turn under the waistband 1/4" and sew.

Step 7

Measure down 1 1/4" on center front seam and sew two button holes - 1 on each side of the seam. Slit the button holes open.

Step 8

Turn the waist band down 1" and sew the fabric down to make a hem casing to thread a drawstring through.

Step 9

Hem the bottom of the legs.

Bag Lining a Garment

This is a method of lining a garment that I find simple and fast. It is not competition worthy.

Step 1

Complete the garment. If you have a serger, go ahead and serge-finish the seam allowances of both the garment and lining hems, side seams, sleeve hems, and underarm seams.

Step 2

Create a temporary hem on the garment. Hand baste all hems 1/4" up from the hem's fold. Steam press the folds.

Step 3

Complete the lining. Be sure and leave one side seam open through which you'll turn the garment right side out. Press all of the lining seams.

Step 4

Sew the lining to the garments front edges and hem, but leave unsewn the bottom 3" of the facing hems. Sew the garment and lining bottom together.

Step 5

Turn the garment by reaching through the opening. Grab the back neck area of the garment, pull the garment right side out through the opening.

Step 6

Sew the hem in place.

Step 7

Sew the sleeve lining hems to the garments sleeve hems.

Step 8

Hand stitch the lining's side seam opening closed.

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